Jul
18
7:00 PM19:00

Humanistic Judaism Study Group - KS Community Room

Topic this month is Women in the Bible. This is another huge topic! The attached document https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_the_Bible is from Wikipedia and includes short biographies of women in different roles. There are a couple of daughters-in-law, a prostitute, several queens, some judges/prophets and even a witch. All of them are influential.

Registration is not required and there is no fee. All are welcome!

 

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Jul
28
1:00 PM13:00

Yiddish Club - KS Community Room

Teiereh khaverim,

Come and bring your friends. Get your Yiddish on, your life will be richer for it.
We'll start again with songs, which we'll read in transliteration or Yiddish, and translation, talk about the songs' histories, and then see and hear them performed on YouTube. Vilne and Vu Iz Dos Gesele, songs of longing, and Itsik Hot Khasene Gehat, a comic song about marriage. Then we'll write a little Yiddish with Lexcilogos Hebrew Keyboard and a phonetically transliterated Yiddish alphabet. And time permitting, we'll return to Lesson 3 in our text, Yiddish In 10 Lessons, and fiddle with verbs and tenses and maybe a little bit of vocabulary.

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Jun
23
1:00 PM13:00

Yiddish Club -KS Community Room

We'll be reading and talking about Yiddish songs, Shpil, Gitar, Play, Guitar, about living for and enjoying the moment, Vu Iz Dos Gesele?, Where Is The Street?, a song of love and longing, and Vilne, Vilnius, about the pre-WWII center of Jewish learning. Then we'll see and hear the songs performed, on YouTube, and see what ideas about them pop up.

 In our text, Yiddish In 10 Lessons, we'll stick with verbs and tenses, but also talk about the vocabulary of the Lesson 3, and write a bit of Yiddish with Lexilogos.

 Kumt ayner, kumt alle, come one, come all, and do bring your friends.

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Jun
20
7:00 PM19:00

Humanistic Judaism Study Group - KS Community Room

This week the Humanistic Study Group will be exploring Jewish myths. This is a huge topic! Where should we begin? It seems appropriate to begin with Genesis or Bere’shite or “In the Beginning.” The attached reading discusses the definition of myth in regards to the creation stories found in Genesis 1-3. There are two creation stories (Genesis 1:1-2:4a and Genesis 2:4b-3:24). What are the differences in the two stories? What is the intention or meaning of each story? What does this mean to us as Humanistic Jews?

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May
26
1:00 PM13:00

Yiddish Club - Kumt ayner, kumt aleh (come one, come all)!

Teiereh khaverim,
We'll start with songs, which we'll read in Yiddish or transliteration and talk about, Yosl Un Sore-Dvoshe, which we didn't get to last time, Vu Iz Dos Gesele?, Where Is the Street?, a song of love and longing, and Shpil, Gitar, Play, Guitar, a song of the Yiddish street. Then we'll hear and see the songs performed on YouTube.

Grammatically, we'll return to and talk about and practice the past, pages 52-58 in our text, Yiddish In 10 Lessons by Chaim Werdyger.

Nochamol, kumt ayner kumt ale (once more, come one come all). As usual, there'll be rugelakh and hamentaschen to nosh.

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May
16
7:00 PM19:00

Humanistic Judaism Study Group - KS Community Room

The Humanistic Judaism Study Group is a self-facilitated study group that meets the third Thursday of the month. Each month we choose a topic of interest related to Humanistic Judaism to discuss at our next meeting. There is no registration and no fee. We welcome guests.

Jewish Mysticism is the topic for this week’s Humanistic Judaism Study Group.   Jewish mysticism had its roots during Second Temple times when mystics attempted to achieve a vision of the divine throne found in the Book of Ezekiel. The chanting of magical hymns and reciting divine names followed during the third and sixth centuries. However, it was during medieval times that Jewish mysticism began to change normative Judaism. Kabbalah flourished in 13th century Spain and is based on The Zohar, a book that focused on understanding the relationship between our world and the divine world. In the 18th century, the Hasidic movement spread throughout Eastern Europe teaching its ideas of having direct experiences with God.

 As humanistic Jews we do not seek a relationship with a divine being. However, we have incorporated some of the ideas of mystical Judaism. The idea of tikkun olam (repairing the world) is one of the most well-known adoptions of an idea from mystical Judaism. At Kol Shalom we include the practice of singing a nigun, a wordless melody developed by the Hasidic movement to evoke the soul of the rabbi who wrote the song. Some questions we will consider are: What is spirituality for a humanistic Jew? What does Jewish spirituality look like for a humanistic Jew? What can we learn from Jewish mysticism?

 What are your thoughts on Jewish mysticism? We look forward to hearing them!

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